2 minutes

The New Coding High School Richmond Area Parents Shouldn't Ignore

A select group of high school students across the Richmond metro area will soon have the ability to graduate with a wealth of computer science education, skills, and work experience, at least in comparison to their peers.

Published Nov 17, 2016 in motherhood, news
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A select group of high school students across the Richmond metro area will soon have the ability to graduate with a wealth of computer science education, skills, and work experience, at least in comparison to their peers. A years-long initiative by Virginia’s Region 1 public schools in partnership with local businesses and community colleges, the Richmond Regional School for Innovation, or CodeRVA, will begin teaching rising 9th and 10th graders a unique hybrid curriculum that officials hope will spread throughout the public school systems.

During the first two years of the program, students will complete most of their high school requirements online, in addition to collaborative projects and in-person interaction with teachers and industry leaders. During the second two years, students will have opportunities to obtain an associate’s degree in computer science, industry certifications, and internships with potentially 400 hours of paid experience. Most impressively, each student will be assigned a career coach who will help them create an individualized college and/or career plan. Students will also benefit from mentorship from local partners.

CodeRVA Logo

CodeRVA Logo

Beginning in the summer of 2017, 8th grade students will have the opportunity to attend a week-long intensive Boot Camp to see if they have the aptitude and interest to do well in computer science.

Meanwhile, interested rising 9th and 10th graders can apply for the new regional high school from January 9, 2017 until February 24, 2017. There is no application criteria as students will be selected by lottery and informed of their acceptance by March 10, 2017; they will have until March 24, 2017 to confirm that they will attend the school beginning in the fall of 2017. The first group of attendees will be 100 students, which should grow to more than 400 students over four years.

The school systems participating in this program are:

  • Chesterfield County
  • Colonial Heights City
  • Dinwiddie County
  • Goochland County
  • Hanover County
  • Henrico County
  • Hopewell City
  • New Kent County
  • Petersburg City
  • Prince George County
  • Richmond City
  • Sussex County

Interested in learning more? There are information sessions coming up for parents and students to get a better idea of the program, with no registration required:

November 29, 2016
Highland Springs High School Library
15 S Oak Ave, Highland Springs, VA 23075
Session I: 5:30-6:30
Session II: 6:45-7:45

December 1, 2016
Thomas Dale High School (Main Campus) Library
3626 W Hundred Rd, Chester, VA 23831
Session I: 5:30-6:30
Session II: 6:45-7:45

Would you take advantage of such a program for your kids? Share your thoughts in the comments!

5 minutes

5 Ways to Involve Young Kids When Coding

Motherhood is a nonstop guilt trip, and few things cut as deep as not seeming to spend enough time with your kids. Combine that with the time-consuming nature of coding, debugging, and research, and you have a recipe for a stressed-out mom.

Published Nov 14, 2016 in lists, motherhood, women in tech